Sewing machines automation in garment

Sewing machines automation in garment

 In this article, garment merchandising will talk about sewing machines automation in garment industry. In ancient times people worked by hand. They made every task, each works without any help. Later they began to do some simple (and later more complicated)

machines, eg. Water wheels for lifting water from channels, mills (water and windmills ) for milling corns, etc. 

They began to use animals to give their force, their power to get work machines, vehicles, etc. In the Sixth Century, the machines were able to do many tasks. Steam engines gave the mechanical energy to machines, but the man had to control every machine. What does it mean to control? Control consists of some activities: 

  1. observe the phenomena (speed of the machine, the pressure of steam, the temperature of Water, etc.)
  2.  compute (decide) the needed activity (growing or reducing the amount of fuel)
  3. set the appropriate device (modify the setting of fuel valves).

 

Generally, control has 3 parts: measuring, computing, setting. During evolution machines became more powerful, quicker,

more precise, thus human control doesn’t fit their tasks. It became necessary to control machines by other machines. This control is automation. This is the short story of automation. 

We can study and we can sewing machines automation in garment industry. The first task is the analysis, and the Second is the synthesis. In life, in the industry, in the machinery, there are a lot of Automated systems. We are dealing with such a system, in which automation works by machines, automatic devices. Here are some examples of sewing machines automation in garment.

Example in Garments Industry:

Automatic presser-foot force control for industrial sewing machines 

electromagnetic force actuator was integrated in an industrial lockstitch machine. A computer-based control system

was designed to implement either speed-variable force control, closed-loop control, or emulating a traditional

constant-force system. Maximum presser-foot displacement values were measured and analyzed in relevant sewing

situations, and seam quality was assessed.

The proposed control system enables the automatic setting and adaptation of force to all sewing situations, making

material handling easier at low speeds without compromising feeding performance at high speed. The closed-loop

controller may be used as a teach-in system for speed-dependent control.

Sewing machines automation in garment

 

The proportional force solenoid was chosen instead of another type of actuator because of its straightforward force

control since force is proportional to the input current over a wide range of strokes. The Wandfluh PI60 presents a

rated maximum force of 65 N, a maximum stroke of 6 mm (with proportional force behavior assured up to 3 mm)

and a step response time of about 50 ms. The response time is not stated on the datasheet, the value has been

conveyed by the manufacturer. This value is a fundamental parameter to consider. It measures the time the actuator

needs between 10% and 90% of the final output value after a very fast (stepwise) change in the input current.

Considering that the sewing machine has a maximum speed of 4000 stitches per minute, each stitch takes about 15

ms, which means that the actuator is only able to converge to the final desired value after a little more than 3

stitches. Some problems at sharp speed variations may be anticipated due to this. Still, this type of actuators is one of

the fastest available, adequate for a proof-of-concept.

Preliminary experiments showed, however, poor results using the force solenoid coupled directly to the presser-foot

bar, such that the set-up was modified to include a spring. The actuator would thus vary pre-tension of the spring,

similarly to PFAFF’s SRP system. In this configuration, the actuator can produce a maximum force of about 33 N

(computed on basis of the maximum stroke of the actuator and the spring constant).

A PC was equipped with a National Instruments PCI-6251 data acquisition board and software to control the system

that was developed in Labview (Figure 4). Labview has been selected as a development tool for its outstanding

flexibility in the development of the controller prototype.

Robotics:

A robot may be a reprogrammable, multifunctional manipulator designed to maneuver material, parts, tools or

specialized devices through variable programmed motions for the performance of a variety of tasks.

•Human senses: sight, sound, touch, taste, and smell provide us vital information to function and survive

•Robot sensors: measure robot configuration/condition and its environment and send such information to the robot

controller as electronic signals (e.g., arm position,presence of toxic gas)

•Robots often need information that’s beyond 5 human senses (e.g., ability to: see within the dark, detect tiny

amounts of invisible radiation, measure movement that’s too small or fast for the human eye to see)

Example in Garments Industry:

  1. INTELLIGENT ROBOTIC HANDLING OF FABRICS TOWARDS SEWING

cloth manufacturing is one among the less automated industries, compared with other industries like an automotive,

computer, etc. the most reason for this delay is that the high bending flexibility of the material in changing its shape

when it’s handled. The high versatility of the material size, type, shape, and material characteristics increase the

difficulties for the introduction of flexible automation in cloth-making industry. the automated systems that are up-

to-date available, are characterized by high specialization, minimal programmability, limited flexibility to changes

and need human intervention to accommodate different sizes and fabric types.Fabric handling operations within the

clothing industry is divided into the subsequent,separation, grasping, translation, placing, positioning, feeding, and

sewing. A lot of has been drained the material acquisition using robotic grippers (Taylor, 1990; man, 1996;

Koustoumpardis & Aspragathos, 2004). While few researchers have on the automated feeding of materials into the

stitching machine.

Example in Garments Industry: 1. INTELLIGENT ROBOTIC HANDLING OF FABRICS TOWARDS SEWING cloth manufacturing is one among the less automated industries, compared with other industries like an automotive, computer, etc. the most reason for this delay is that the high bending flexibility of the material in changing its shape when it's handled. The high versatility of the material size, type, shape, and material characteristics increase the difficulties for the introduction of flexible automation in cloth-making industry. the automated systems that are up-to-date available, are characterized by high specialization, minimal programmability, limited flexibility to changes and need human intervention to accommodate different sizes and fabric types. fabric handling operations within the clothing industry is divided into the subsequent separation, grasping, translation, placing, positioning, feeding, and sewing. A lot of has been drained the material acquisition using robotic grippers (Taylor, 1990; man, 1996; Koustoumpardis & Aspragathos, 2004). While few researchers have on the automated feeding of materials into the stitching machine

  1. MAGIX AUTOMATIC GATHERING AND SEWING LINE

The Magix line enables sewing automation on a fair larger scale than the Multiplex SA line. Not only does the Magix

line perform in-line gathering and sewing, but it may also automatically unload sewn book blocks and covey them to

an automatic palletizer or a back lining machine. The Magix line consists of an MX gathering machine and up to 5

Aster book sewing machines with automatic loading and unloading. the stitching machines will be Aster 180, Aster

220C or Aster 220 SA, in standard or large size. Such a high number of stitching machines enable the Magix line to

supply enough book blocks per minute to create an immediate reference to a book destination economically viable.

The unloading a part of the Magix system may also be combined with other styles of automatic loading systems:

Multiplex SA, Bombax, and Bombix. The MX gathering machine consists of three-station modules, each of which is

controlled by its own Siemens S7 PLC. this allows sequential switching on and off of stations and straightforward

retrofit of additional modules at a later stage. The speed of the gathering machine varies automatically in keeping

with the necessities of the stitching machines. so as to get a surplus of gathered signatures. The hoppers of the MX

gathering machine are equipped with the SignaLynx loading and gathering error detection system. Artificial vision

technology combined with high-resolution Image scanning enables the SignaLynx system to acknowledge even text-

only signatures without a controversy. The SignaLynx system requires only one book to automatically memories the

proper signature sequence. The hoppers have centralized set-up in keeping with the signature Spine length. The

extracting grippers feature automatic thickness control for the detection of missing signatures and double pick-ups.

Small stairs enable the operator to simply reach the opposite side of the gathering machine. At the delivery of the

gathering, machine collated books are stacked in 100 mm packs. The piling station requires no set-up and offers

good insight through its large windows. The signature packs are distributed among transport channels and conveyed

to the stitching machines. Signatures are stacked and transported within the vertical position on their spines so

there’s no risk of marking. The signatures are conveyed to the indeed hoppers of the stitching machines and

automatically loaded as needed.

 

 

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